Toddler- Pre K

  • A Fish Life

    Reading to toddlers is important for a variety of reasons. Reading teaches vocabulary, connections between words and pictures, and social skills. In this simple activity, children will get to enjoy story time with a fish-related book while viewing real life fish in our atrium aquariums.

    Area: Atrium Aquariums

  • Fish Food

    A toddler classroom activity to create an ocean fish scene with glue, crayons and a few craft materials. This promotes dexterity, sharing and imagination.

    Areas: Atrium Aquariums & Classroom (Available as an outreach activity)

  • Fishbowl Art

    A toddler classroom activity to create a fishbowl scene with glue, crayons and a few craft materials.This promotes dexterity, sharing and imagination.

    Areas: Atrium Aquariums & Classroom (Available as an outreach activity)

  • Fish Puppet

    A toddler classroom activity to create a fish puppet with crayons and a few craft materials. This promotes dexterity, sharing, and imagination play.

    Areas: Atrium Aquariums & Classroom (Available as an outreach activity)

  • Origami Fish World

    A toddler classroom activity to create origami fish with paper and a few craft materials. This promotes dexterity, sharing and imagination.

    Areas: Atrium Aquariums & Classroom (Available as an outreach activity)

K-5th

  • The Facts of Matter (K)

    Water is an important part of a fish’s life. Students will understand and illustrate mater in terms of water. They will also complete an experiment to illustrate buoyancy in water and help to explain how fish maintain their space in water.

    SOL Connections: K.1, K.5

    Areas: Atrium Aquariums

  • Is It Alive? (K-1)

    Although it looks hard, coral is a living organism that provides structure for reef habitats. Students will discover basic characteristics of living things and why hard coral is alive. They will also build an edible model of a hard coral polyp.

    SOL Connections: K.1, K.6, 1.1, 1.5

    Areas: Atrium Aquariums

  • Energy and the Environment (K-3)

    Energy is all around us. In this lesson, students will explore the two types of energy and play a jeopardy style game with questions about energy, the environment, and ways to decrease our impact.

    Areas: Rooftop

  • S’more Energy (K-3)

    There are many ways to produce energy. In this activity, students will discuss solar energy and create and use their own solar oven.

    Areas: Rooftop, Outreach, take home curriculum

  • Camo Creatures (K-1)

    Many reef organisms depend on their coloration to help them blend into their surroundings. Students recognize how and why camouflage is effective for evading prey by creating their own camouflaged fish. After, they will hide it and search for other students’ fish.

    SOL Connections: K.1, 1.1, 1.5

    Areas: Atrium Aquariums

  • Bye Bye Bycatching (K-1)

    One of the major issues with commercial fishing is bycatching. Students will learn what bycatching is and how it happens. They will graph the sea creatures “caught” and brainstorm possible solutions to reduce bycatching.

    SOL Connections: K.1, K.2, K.13, K.14, K.15, 1.1, 1.5, 1.14, 1.15, 1.16

    Areas: Atrium Aquariums and Classroom, Outreach

  • Surviving the Ocean (2)

    Observing aquatic life in a controlled habitat allows students to explore how organisms have interdependent relationships with each other and examine what basic characteristics define a habitat. Students will scientifically compare humans and fish with simple drawings and diagrams.

    SOL Connections: 2.1, 2.5

    Area: Atrium Aquarium

  • It’s Snot What You Think (2-4)

    Mucus is a beneficial substance for many organisms, especially fish. Several coral reef species use mucus to cover their scent and/or protect themselves. Students will learn how certain fish use mucus by getting hands on experience with lab made mucus.

    SOL Connections: 2.1, 2.5, 3.1, 3.4, 4.1, 4.5

    Areas: Atrium Aquariums, Outreach

  • What’s For Dinner? (2-4)

    Coral reefs provide plentiful amounts of food in many different forms. Different fish have different mouthparts that dictate what kind of food they eat on the reef. This helps the animals find their “feeding niche.” Students will correlate different types of mouth parts to the types of food available on a coral reef.

    SOL Connections: 2.1, 2.5, 3.4, 3.5, 4.5

    Areas: Atrium Aquariums & Classroom, Outreach

  • Old as Earth (2-4)

    Earth is approximately 4.6 billion years old and oceans have been here for 3.8 billion years. Students will explore the geologic time scale along with the concept of million and billion by making a necklace depicting major events in Earth’s history.

    SOL Connections: 2.1, 2.5, 3.1, 4.1

    Areas: Atrium Aquariums & Classroom, Outreach

  • Shell Shock (2-4)

    Each turtle species, both fresh water and salt water, have a unique shell pattern. Students will observe turtle shells and discover that turtle species can be identified by shell pattern.

    SOL Connections: 2.1, 3.1, 3.4, 4.5

    Areas: Atrium Aquariums

  • Survivor: Coral Reef Edition (3-5)

    Organisms develop both physical and behavioral adaptation to help them survive on the reef. Students will discover how fish adaptations help them escape predators through games and pictures.

    SOL Connections: 3.4, 3.5, 3.6, 4.5, 5.5, 5.6

    Areas: Atrium Aquariums

  • Paper Harpoons (3-5)

    Jellyfish are not actually fish; they are cnidarians (like coral). Jellyfish protect themselves using nematocysts, cell equipped with harpoon-like “stingers.” Students will explore how jellyfish use
    nematocysts to capture pretty by making one out of paper and thread.

    SOL Connections: 3.4, 4.5, 5.5

    Areas: Atrium Aquariums

  • Let’s Make a Deal (3-5)

    Coral reefs are the most biodiverse ocean environment in the world. The symbiotic relationships between certain organisms are responsible for the biodiversity. Students will discover the importance of the relationships between certain organisms by playing a modified version of “Let’s Make A Deal.”

    SOL Connections: 3.6, 4.5, 5.5, 5.6

    Areas: Atrium Aquariums

  • Mini-Pinball (4-5)

    By creating a miniature pinball machine, students can experiment with the forces that make a pinball machine work. Adding obstacles can allow observation of cause and effect. Simple levers can be explained using the miniature machine.

    SOL Connections: 4.2, 4.3, Ph.5

    Areas: Roanoke Pinball Museum & Classroom, Outreach, Take-home

  • t’s All Downhill (4-5)

    Students can experiment with velocity using simple ramps, obstacles and different surfaces and objects. By recording their observations, students can make educated decisions about energy and how it works.

    SOL Connections: 4.2, 4.3, Ph.5

    Areas: Roanoke Pinball Museum

6th- 8th

  • Healthy Ecosystems (6)

    The lesson will allow students to examine the impact humans can have on oceanic ecosystems. Students will explore the ecosystem found in the aquarium, looking at both biotic and abiotic components. Students will work with various objects to replicate the possible impact pollution can have on ocean life.

    SOL Connections: 6.1, 6.7

    Areas: Atrium Aquariums

  • Food Webs and Energy Flow in Ecosystems (7)

    The lesson will allow students to categorize the life forms in the aquarium ecosystem, as well as, explore energy flow, an energy pyramid, and interdependent relationships between organisms.

    SOL Connections: LS.1, LS. 6

    Areas: Atrium Aquariums

  • GloFish Genetics (6-8)

    Students will use GloFish and Punnett squares to explore how certain traits are inherited.

    SOL Connections: LS. 12, LS.13

    Areas: Atrium Aquariums & Classroom, Outreach

  • Ocean Aquarium Chemistry (6-8)

    This hands-on lesson demonstrates how increased carbon dioxide affects the ocean.

    SOL Connections: 6.4, 6.5, 6.6, 6.7, LS.6, LS.10, LS.11, LS.13, PS.2

    Areas: Atrium Aquariums & Classroom